Pre-Cut ‘Donut’ Quilt

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PreCut Donut Quilt

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No-Stress Window Pane Quilt!

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The Clever Quilt Studio

Window Pane Quilt - CleverQuiltStudio

 

Quick Batik Jelly Roll Quilt – Modified Plus

Hi Everyone!

 It has been forever, right? I know, I’m sorry.  See, no one told me when I decided to start this blog a little over a year ago that I would be cheating on it with summer.  There was just too much going on and if there is sunshine, well, I need to be outside!

In addition to running, biking and paddle boarding I was commissioned to create two batik style quilts and so the Falling Charms quilt had to take a back seat for paying gigs.  My apologies, but guess what? I have the first of the two batik quilts ready to show you as a kind of peace-offering for neglecting you all so much this summer?

While I know that we need to finish up the Falling Charms quilt (trust me…it is coming very soon) I wanted to show you the two quilts that I did as contracts over the summer.  One was for my Uncle Steve and one was a service swap for an exterminator. Have I mentioned that my house was built in the early 70s and has some ‘quirks’?  Well anyway both of the clients liked batiks so I figured I would show you them in a couple of posts.  First up the quilt for my Uncle.

I am going to call this the Batik Plus quilt, get it? 😉 You are going to be amazed at how easy this quilt is! Here’s the finished product; ready to get started? Let’s Go!

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Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 1 Jelly Roll (I used a Treat Strip from Timeless Treasures that I bought at my local quilt shop.) This one was Lemon Poppy.
  • Yardage for the inner border
  • Yardage for the outer border
  • Yardage for the backing Fabric

Start by opening up your Bali-Pop (this is really the best part right? Seeing what fabulous colors await you!)

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For this quilt I wanted to emphasize the modified-plus sign by using the light strips in the middle.  Once you open you pop you will want to group them in 3s keeping a light strip as the top for each one.  This process took me a bit trying to get the right contrast, etc.  Here is an example of one of one of the triplicate strips.

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If you look closely at the quilt above you will see that not all the ‘pluses’ have matching centers.  Hint: It’s the middle vertical row.  This is okay because most of the centers matched, but the corresponding two strips did not.  Why did I do this? Well, it’s simple really when working with pre-cuts you get to work with what is given.  That, to me, is why I love pre-cuts.

The next step is to sew your sets of three together. You will want to make sure that your light color is always on top (as per the picture above).  Use a 1/4” seam and press them to whichever side you feel most comfortable.

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Next you will want to cut the strips into your squares.  Since we want them to be squares you will need to measure the width of your strip set and cut accordingly. This is where accurate or consistent 1/4” seams will be crucial. Meaning, if your sewn together strip width is 6.5” then you need to cut at 6.5”. Luckily most of your blocks will be at 6.5” with accurate seams.

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IMG_2414_Fotor

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Once you have all of your blocks cut we can now arrange them on our project wall, bed, floor. You will have a few inches of scraps…unless you are like me and accidentally mis-measure a time or two! Plus these left overs will be great for a table runner? Maybe a cute bag?

All you have to do to get the modified plus sign is to simply rotate your squares!  Like I said, this is a quick one.  I think deciding on the final layout took me longer than the actual assembly.

Here is shot of the block:

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Okay let’s get assembling, shall we?
First off we need to match the center seams.  What is great is that because we always pressed to one side most of them should be able to be nested. Start by sewing the top left and top right 6.5” blocks together.

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Notice how one is horizontal and one is vertical?  Trust me, there will be at least one block where you stitch it, press it, and cock your head and think ‘hmm that doesn’t look right’. It’s okay, we all do it. (I, at least, like to think we all do it so please don’t correct me if I’m wrong. It makes my blonde hair feel better. 😉 )

Once you’ve stitched the top left and top right 6.5” squares together repeat with the bottom left and the bottom right.  Now it is time to match the center seams and complete the full 12” block.  Deep breathe…ready, Set, GO!

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Start by linking up the center seam (hopefully nest-able) and pin.  Like a carpenter “measure twice, cut once” a quilter will “line up twice, pin once, rip…none!”

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Once finished press your seams and check your work.

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www.notmygrandmasquilts.com

With pinning you should have a perfectly matched center seam every time.

For final assembly you will want to follow how we read; in rows left to right.

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After all the rows are complete you can add a border if you want a bigger quilt.  Since my uncle wanted a twin sized quilt I added a border. Plus I like the way it frames the modified plus signs.

The border is relatively easy except if you have never had to extend a piece to fit.  You will want to miter the edges for this so it lays flat and minimized seam bulk when quilting.  If you have followed other tutorials of mine you are a pro at this now, but if not let’s dive in! 😉

First you will want right sides together in an ‘L’ shape just overlapping each other like above.  Then you will stitch corner to corner. Simple as that.  Once you have stitched simply trim the large ‘dog ear’ or excess past 1/4” seam and you now have your angled edge. Make sure when you trim you leave at least that 1/4” like you had cut it prior to sewing.  The last thing you want is for your border to unravel.

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Now you can attached the border then it is off to quilting and binding.

I promise to have the old ‘Quilting and Binding’ tutorial up soon so you can refer to it.  Until then, if you have any questions on spray batting, quilting and or binding please leave me a comment and I will help as best I can or shoot an email over to notmygrandmasquilts@gmail.com.

Until next time, which I promise will be very soon (I have a big announcement coming!)

Happy Quilting,
Crystal